Child Custody — A Necessity When Parents Are Separated Or Divorced

The legal term for child custody in Colorado is allocation of parental responsibilities. This phrase is an apt descriptor for the issues that parents need to sort out when they live separately. A child custody decree should clarify how parenting time and responsibilities will be divided for:

  • Parents who were never married and never cohabited
  • Parents who cohabited but were not married
  • Parents — either biological or adoptive — who were married and are now approaching divorce

It is also essential for cohabiting but unmarried couples to have a court order in case of any disruption of the family. Unmarried fathers in particular should consult with a family law attorney about paternity determination and child custody rights.

At the family law firm of Bradley Devitt Haas & Watkins, P.C., in Golden, you will find compassion and insightful guidance as you work through the issues involved in a child custody case. Whether your separation from the other parent is brand new or is already well-established, Colorado family law attorney Andrew D. Haas can advise you with your chief concerns, namely:

  • Determination of a first-time child custody order
  • Visitation rights for the parent without primary custody
  • Modification of a child custody order
  • Enforcement of a child custody order
  • What to do if the other parent is not showing up for his or her allotted parenting time

Mr. Haas handles high-conflict child custody cases as well as more amicable ones. The best interests of the child are paramount in all child custody cases. A family law judge will expect allocation of parental responsibilities to uphold the child's best interests. The resulting court order should clarify which parent (or both parents) will decide where a child will go to school, obtain medical care, go to summer camp and spend holidays.

Contact A Knowledgeable, Caring Lawyer Regarding Your Colorado Child Custody Case

Call Bradley Devitt Haas & Watkins, P.C., at 303-552-2615 or send an email message through this website to request a consultation regarding allocation of parental responsibilities, including child support, when you and the other parent are contemplating or headed for separation or divorce.